Daphne Mayo Visiting Fellowship

Daphne Mayo

To honour and commemorate the life of one of Queensland’s most prominent artists and arts educators, the School of Communication and Arts at The University of Queensland, has established the biennial Daphne Mayo Visiting Professorship in Visual Culture.

Daphne Mayo (1895-1982) was for much of her life Queensland’s best known artist and passionate advocate for the arts. Her work includes the Tympanum on the Brisbane City Hall and the Women’s War Memorial in Anzac Square. She was a trustee of the Queensland Art Gallery 1960–1967, established an art reference library now at The University of Queensland, and left her private papers to UQ’s Fryer Library.

The Daphne Mayo Visiting Professorship in Visual Culture was established with initial funding from the Philip Bacon Gallery and the School. Since 2005 the Alumni Association of the University of Queensland has joined with the School and the University of Queensland Art Museum (UQAM) to support the Visiting Professorship. This association has benefited the Visiting Professorship enormously by enabling us to better connect with UQ Alumni and Friends and by ensuring its greater public visibility and impact. The Visiting Professorship is now a catalyst for dialogue and debate not only about art but also about art museums and galleries and art collecting and appreciation in the State.

Each year, a major world figure will visit Brisbane to speak about the latest trends, influences, and theories in their area of visual culture. 

 

 


Daphne Mayo Visiting Scholars

  • 2016: Professor Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, University of Birmingham
  • 2015: Not awarded in 2015
  • 2014: Emeritus Professor Thomas Elsaesser, University of Amsterdam
  • 2013: Professor Timothy Ingold, University of Aberdeen
  • 2012: Professor Deborah Howard, University of Cambridge
  • 2011: Professor Anne Marsh, Monash University
  • 2010: Professor William Rothman, University of Miami
  • 2009: Professor Ian McLean, University of Western Australia
  • 2008: Professor Terry Smith, University of Pittsburgh
  • 2007: Associate Professor James Meyer, Emory University, Atlanta
  • 2006: Professor Roger Benjamin, University of Sydney
  • 2005: Professor Leonard Bell, University of Auckland
  • 2004: Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe, Art Center College of Design, Pasadena
  • 2003: David Jaffe, National Gallery, London