Gulgong Miners, 1872. (Credit: Beaufoy Merlin / Charles Bayliss)

Date: Wednesday, 29 March
Time: 1pm-2pm
Location: IASH Seminar Room, Level 4, Forgan Smith Tower (Bldg #1)

 

Abstract:

This paper offers some preliminary archaeology, focused on English novels of the second half of the 19th century, about the literature of mining in Australia, in relation to a global and cultural dichotomy about the history and representation of the extractive industries and the environment. Late Victorian realist fiction addresses the social disruption caused by the raw reality of the sources of wealth – precious metals and their extraction – in different and complex ways, according to their antipodal orientation. 

 

Presenter Bio:

Philip Mead is inaugural Chair of Australian Literature and Director of the Westerly Centre at the University of Western Australia. Philip teaches units in Australian Literary Studies, at Honours level, and the English units in the Master of Curriculum Studies (English) course, a collaborative course between the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Education.

Philip’s research is at the intersections of national and transnational literary studies, cultural history and theory, poetics, literary education, and digital humanities. He has led nationally competitive research and teaching grants, most recently the ALTC funded project, ‘Australian Literature Teaching Survey’ (2009), the ARC Discovery Project grant for 2010-2012, ‘Monumental Shakespeares: an investigation of transcultural commemoration in 20th-century Australia and England' (with Gordon McMullan, King's College London), and the OLT funded Extension project ‘Update and Expansion of the AustLit Resource Teaching with AustLit site’ (2013-2014). He is also CI on the ARC Discovery Project grant for 2016-19, 'Investigating literary knowledge in the education of English teachers' (with Larissa McLean Davies and Lyn Yates, University of Melbourne, Brenton Doecke, Deakin University, and Wayne Sawyer, Western Sydney University). He is on the board of management of the ARC LIEF funded AustLIt consortium.

Professor Philip Mead

http://www.web.uwa.edu.au/people/philip.mead


 

About Research Seminar and Workshop Series

The research seminar and workshop series' occur each semester, each with a different topic and guest speaker from UQ or otherwise.

The seminars occur on a Friday afternoon from 3-4 pm in Room 601 in the Michie Building (#9).

Semester 1, 2017 Seminars & Workshops

 

Week 5:
Wednesday, 29 March
1-2pm

Seminar:  The disruptions of gold: some archaeology of the literary cultures of the global south

IASH Seminar Room, Level 4, Forgan Smith Tower (Bldg #1)

Prof Philip Mead, Chair of Australian Literature at the University of Western Australia

Week 6:
Friday, 7 April
3-4pm

Seminar: Strategising communication and collective action towards sustainable nomadic livelihoods (Mongolia)​

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

A/Prof Elske Van de Fliert

Week 8:
Friday, 28 April
3-4pm

Seminar: Ageing in a foreign land: A social identity approach to enhancing connectedness and well-being

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

A/Prof Shuang Liu

Week 9:
Friday, 5 May
3-4pm

Workshop: ARC Applications - What I Wish I'd Known

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

Afternoon tea will be served in the kitchen area of level 6 of Michie building at the end of the session

Dr Kim Wilkins

Aims: To provide information on the do's and don'ts related to preparing for ARC grant applications

Audience: Early Career Researchers; Staff new to the ARC

Week 10:
Friday, 12 May
3-4pm

Workshop: ARC Fellowships - When, Why & How

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

Afternoon tea will be served in the kitchen area of level 6 of Michie building at the end of the session

 

A/Prof Anna Johnston and Dr Jessica White

Aims: To provide information on ARC future Fellowship, DECRA, & other fellowships

Audience: Staff who are planning to apply for ARC fellowships, and/or other fellowships

 

Week 11:
Friday, 19 May
3-4pm

Seminar: Hyperlocal Journalism & Digital Disruption

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

Dr Scott Downman and Mr Richard Murray
Week 12: 
Friday, 26 May
3-4pm

Seminar: Copyright and Creativity: Is Australian Policy Hurting Creators?

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

University Professor Patricia Aufderheide (School of Communication, American University)
SWOTVAC:
Friday 9 June
3-4pm

Seminar: The Poetics of Religious Toleration in the Long British Eighteenth Century

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

Dr Brandon Chua
Exam Period:
Friday, 16 June
3-4pm

Workshop: ARC Linkage Grants - When, Why & How

Room 601, Michie Building (#9)

Afternoon tea will be served in the kitchen area of level 6 of Michie building at the end of the session

A/Prof Shuang LiuMs Sarina Hobbin, Prof Annemaree Carroll

Aims: To provide information on building ARC Linkage grant applications including negotiating with partner organisations

Audience: Staff who are considering developing ARC Linkage grant applications

Venue

Level 4 Seminar Room, Forgan Smith Tower (#Bld 1)
Room: 
IASH Seminar Room