In light of the developing COVID-19 situation, The University of Queensland has taken important steps to ensure the health and wellbeing of our students, staff, alumni, partners and broader community.

UQ has made a decision to cancel all University events unless they are critical to teaching or research. This includes student, academic and public events on and off-campus until the end of June 2020.

Our thoughts are with all of you managing the consequences of the virus during this unprecedented time.

Forum: What can the humanities tell us about COVID-19?

24 July 2020 10:00am12:00pm
The University of Queensland (UQ) is bringing together leaders in humanities research and their wealth of expertise to offer a dynamic online forum which will provide important insights into the COVID-19 crisis.

Creativity in the time of COVID-19

18 June 2020 6:00pm7:00pm
In the midst of a global pandemic and upheaval that comes with it, creative pursuits can be impeded by uncertainty, anxiety and isolation. How can one write about the world when it looks so different than it did a few months ago?

Research Seminar - Imagining the End of the World: Writing the Apocalypse before COVID-19

5 June 2020 12:00pm1:00pm
What can the Middle Ages teach us about acknowledging the fragility of our own lives in a time of great uncertainty? And how can creative practice help us translate those understandings? Dr Helen Marshall presents.

CSC Exchange: everyday practices of women and climate change adaptation

22 April 2020 12:00pm1:00pm
The latest Centre for Communication and Social Change CSC Exchange series will be hosted via Zoom. 

Can an investigation of women's everyday practices in responding to climate change effects help to understand social change? This study will try to describe the links between climate change adaptation, gender and power through the lens of social practice concepts.

Presented by: Debashish Dev who is involved in the teaching profession and works extensively in the field of agricultural communication and rural development.

Literature as Media: Chinese Online Literature—Storytellers, platforms and transmedia literary world (CANCELLED)

Cancelled
13 March 2020 2:00pm4:00pm
In this seminar Tony Xiang Ren will begin by presenting a paper on emerging cultural and industrial practices of Chinese Online Literature in the age of platformisation and transmediality. Chinese Online Literature started to boom in the 1990s and has evolved into a large scale, born-digital, publishing and transmedia entertainment industry. This storytelling industry has disrupted the established literary system. It further explores the paradoxical roles of platforms in the liberalisation of literature and the commercialisation of participatory literary production in the Chinese context. The paper highlights the changing practices of platforms, storytellers and fans in a transmedia and transcultural literary world and the interplay between the Chinese and global models of online publishing. After his presentation a panel consisting of A/Prof Kim Wilkins, Dr Helen Marshall and Emily Baulch will respond drawing on their experience of English language publishing dynamics and its transmedial and platformising literary worlds.
Daphne Mayo 2020

2020 Daphne Mayo Public Lecture

12 March 2020 5:15pm8:00pm
To honour and commemorate the life of one of Queensland’s most prominent artists and arts educators, the School of Communication and Arts at The University of Queensland, has established the biennial Daphne Mayo Visiting Professorship in Visual Culture.

In 2020 Professor Murray Smith will be presenting the Daphne Mayo Public Lecture entitled: Remain in Light: Philosophical Naturalism, Aesthetic Value, and Cultural Crosstalk.

Digital publishing in China: Disruption, convergence and re-conceptualisation (CANCELLED)

Cancelled
12 March 2020 4:00pm5:00pm
Digital publishing is broadly defined in industry and policy contexts in China as including eBooks, digital newspapers, mobile publishing, blogging, internet advertising, digital music, online games, online animation and online education. According to the 2017/8 Annual Report of the Chinese Digital Publishing Industry, the total digital publishing revenue is 833 billion RMB (AU$ 170 billion), but the sectors closely related to print publishing like eBooks only account for 1.03%. What does this broad digital content system mean for publishers? What are the new opportunities in the age of disruption and convergence? And what are the unique digital publishing practices in China? In this lecture, I will give you a brief introduction of China’s digital publishing transformation through the case studies of initiatives in eBooks, audiobooks, social reading and transmedia adaptation. I will also discuss how China’s digital publishing innovation shed new light on the global understanding of publishing futures and the new opportunities for Australian publishers and writers in China’s emergent digital content markets. This seminar will be presented by Dr Tony Xiang Ren, University of Western Sydney and is timed so Writing, Editing and Publishing students are able to attend.
Consorting with Film Characters

Talk: Consorting with Film Characters

11 March 2020 6:00pm7:00pm
Join Professor Murray Smith from the University of Kent, UK, who will discuss the vast space of character design, within which there is room enough for the comic and the dramatic, the realist and the reflexive, the good, the bad, the ugly, and all points in between. Co-presented with the School of Communications and Arts, University of Queensland, this talk will be followed by a free screening of Chloé Zhao's The Rider 2017.


CSC Exchange - Rural Community Radio for Women Empowerment

11 March 2020 12:00pm1:00pm
Presented by Doreen Busolo, this seminar exchange session will discuss if rural community radio contributes to the delivery of political, economic and social empowerment for women in Kenya. This study will also investigate the role of radio in communication for social change.

Research Seminar – Digital Workshops of the World: Software, Source Code and Skills Migration in the Global VFX Industries

28 February 2020 2:00pm4:00pm
Over the last three decades, a network of globally distributed digital visual effects (VFX) companies have arisen from Hollywood’s traditional base in Los Angeles. What started out as a branch of computer sciences and their IT industry correlates hybridized into entities that are neither ‘inside’ the Hollywood studios traditional financial structures, nor entirely outside the value chains attached to Hollywood’s film output. The global VFX industries have functioned as networks of precarious creative industries, offering work for hire on a film by film, contract by contract basis. All of this has led to an industry defined by the migration of labour to an extent that has dwarfed even traditional Hollywood production.

First Year Bootcamp - Journalism and Communication Students

28 February 2020 9:00am1:00pm
Are you a first year Journalism or Communication student?
Make sure to register for our 1st Year Bootcamp where you will learn everything you need to know about radio, video and digital media! It is also a great way to meet new friends in your program!

We have some great prizes to give away and will be providing a free BBQ!
International Welcome Celebration

Welcome Celebration: International Student Mixer

27 February 2020 5:00pm7:00pm
Want to know why we love UQ and life in Brisbane? Come along to our Welcome Celebration.
You can meet new friends, learn more about your program, and discuss job opportunities with School experts and other international students.

Visualising Data: From Astrodata to Energy with A/Prof Leon Gurevitch

27 February 2020 11:00am12:30pm
Hear Dr Leon Gurevitch talk through three main data visualisation projects undertaken in the last ten years including the unexpected positive outcomes and challenges to visualising data across different subject matters and industries.

Neuroatypicality and Diversity

26 February 2020 1:00pm2:30pm
The relationship between neuro-diversity and creativity has long been referred to but seldom understood. Conditions such as autism, dyslexia and ADHD have often been observed to play a part in creative and innovative thinking at the same time as there is an increasing body of research linking these same conditions to stark disparities in life chances. Neuro-diversity, it seems, has been a boon for creative thinkers. With computational models mimicking the logic of neural networks on the rise, this talk will consider the ways neural networks are currently being created and implemented to simulate and produce neuro-typical results. There are dangers in privileging neurotypicality over neuro-atypical serendipity. Building AI systems that ignore human neurological atypicality could be dangerous. In order to avoid replicating neuro-atypical invisibility neural-network research and more complex AI systems research must start addressing the role neurodiversity plays in producing novel and innovative breakthroughs.

Roundtable: Artificial Intelligence, Agency, and Ethics in Cultural Practice

20 February 2020 9:30am12:00pm
There are many historical examples of art responding to imperatives from outside of art. AI seems set to have this kind of influence. There are examples of plausible-appearing AI-produced art. AI-written screenplays show that the machines still have a long way to go but they should alert us to possible futures in which our most celebrated artists are machines. I connect this issue with the long-running debate about whether it’s possible for a machine to think. This could make it rational for us to respond to AI art not with amusement, but with hostility.
The Writers Studio

The Writers Studio: Student Welcome Event

19 February 2020 11:00am12:00pm
Do you have a passion for writing?
Be one of the first to see the beautiful new space for students - The Writers Studio. At this welcome event you will meet like-minded students, listen to world-class readings and discover all the ways you can study writing at UQ!

A delicious spread of afternoon treats will also be provided.

Roundtable: The Digital and Our Social Natures

19 February 2020 9:30am12:00pm
What can philosophy bring to debates about how humans will inhabit the digital age? The particular debate I focus on concerns the role of humans in the economies of the future. We frequently hear that human workers face a threat from more efficient machines. What can we offer to compensate for the decline in the economic value of our efforts? There are too many overconfident forecasts about what the digital future offers us as social beings. Philosophers can bring the attitude of Socrates who said he knew nothing but at least knew that. Philosophers should be like Socrates challenging the overconfident forecasts of economists and technologists. When philosophers perform this service we should also avoid our own variety of overconfidence that comes from placing too much credence on what we take to be the most rationally coercive argument. In this context I argue for a significant expansion of the category of social work to protect against the divisive influences of social media and its filter bubbles.

Promotional Culture of the Platform

29 November 2019 9:30am5:00pm
Social media and search now dominate Australian media advertising expenditures and advertiser and marketer attention. However this advertising is some distance from our traditional advertising forms in that it is neither public nor visible. Instead it is taking place in a largely unregulated media space that lacks public visibility and scrutinising oversight. Presentations by: Tom O’Regan, Sam Kininmoth, Mark Andrejevic, Sven Broedmerkel, Richie Barker, and Jane Johnson. Discussants Katie Brennan, Franzisca Weder, Caroline Wilson-Barnao.
VIDEO AVAILABLE

Symposium - Bodies and Devices: Geolocative Media

28 November 2019 9:00am4:00pm
Bodies and Devices: Geolocative Media explores the networked body as fundamental to understandings of both the body and the digital economy. The geolocated body is tracked, networked, coded, monitored and represented on a range of digital media platforms. This involves making available the body to the algorithmic and participatory logics of digital media platforms and an entangling of its experiences with these architectures. Presentations by: Peta Mitchell, Frederico Fialho Teixeira, Sarah Barns, Thao Phan, and Scott McQuire.
VIDEO AVAILABLE

Image Machines Workshop

19 November 2019 10:00am2:00pm

Image Machines Workshop

19 November 2019 10:00am2:00pm
Instagram’s large and engaged user base and distinctive everyday visual cultures have eluded intensive study due to the scarcity of methods for data collection and analysis. Instamancer is an Instagram data gathering tool developed for collecting and processing Instagram posts and media files without requiring access to an API. It was developed through both the "Platform Media: Algorithms, Accountability and Design" and is a key outcome of the Visual Social Media stream of the "Platform Media" initiative. It represents the experimental media and research ambitions of those involved in the Platform Media initiative focusing as it does on the developing and testing of new ideas for the media industry as well as critical scholarship in our respective fields of research. Presented by Nicholas Carah and Dan Angus.
VIDEO AVAILABLE

The Logic of Instagram: Affiliations, Aesthetics, Attention

11 November 2019 10:00am12:00pm
This presentation explores Instagram’s impact on art and visual culture by considering how it has shaped the production and consumption of street art in the public domain, sometimes affecting its appearance but also changing its context, production, audiences and meaning. While shaping these dynamics, the architecture of Instagram yields data that can help map and describe the contours and networks of graffiti and street art as a global system. Presented by Lachlan MacDowell.
VIDEO AVAILABLE

A Roundtable on Streaming with Arnt Maasø

24 October 2019 11:00am12:30pm
Since the introductions of YouTube (2005), Netflix (streaming since 2007) and Spotify (2008), users are increasingly accessing cultural products via streaming services instead of owning them. This on-demand access to vast digital catalogues of works combines technologies and business models in ways that are profoundly shaping cultural practice. Presenter Arnt Maasø discusses this shift towards streaming and the major international research project on streaming of which he is a part.
VIDEO AVAILABLE

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