Rhythm as a Metaphor for Presence in Prose Fiction​

Presented by Dr Eliza Robertson

Date: Wednesday 9 May, 2018
Time: 3pm-4pm
Location: Digital Learning Space (Room 224, Level 2), Joyce Ackroyd Building (#37) 

Abstract:

This essay explores the concept of rhythm as a metaphor for presence in literary fiction. To begin, I identify and unpick the prevailing metaphor for presence: voice. Next, I draw upon Jacques Derrida’s critique of Saussurian linguistics to unravel the historic veneration of presence in theories of speech and writing. The third section explores the distinction between conventional and creative metaphors and pitches rhythm as an alternative, more “vital” metaphor for presence in literary prose. Once I lay the theoretical brickwork, I turn to my own creative practice with a discussion of rhythm in relation to my first novel, Demi-Gods. Though I share Derrida’s findings that presence is not necessarily superior to absence, I strive for something like presence in my own work. That is: I aim to produce “vital” writing by way of “animated” language and “lively” characters. To bridge this apparent inconsistency, I argue that vital writing describes a process rather than an end point. I offer the gerund “presenting” as a way to articulate presence as practice, or a work in progress, rather than an objective good on which to hinge a hierarchy of expression.

 

Presenter:

Eliza Robertson studied creative writing at the University of Victoria and the University of East Anglia, where she received the Man Booker Scholarship and Curtis Brown Prize. In 2013, she won the Commonwealth Short Story Prize and was shortlisted for the Journey Prize and CBC Short Story Prize. Her debut story collection, Wallflowers, was shortlisted for the East Anglia Book Award and selected as a New York Times editor’s choice. In 2017 she won the Australian Book Review Elizabeth Jolley Story Prize.

Dr Eliza Robertson

 

About Research Seminar and Workshop Series

 


School of Communication and Arts Research Seminar Series

The research seminar and workshop series occur each semester, each with a different topic and guest speaker from UQ or otherwise.

Friday, 5 March
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - What Has Streaming Done to Television? Platform Interfaces and Contemporary Viewing Dr Elliott Logan

Friday, 5 March
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Building cultural citizenship through drama: A study of The Community Theatre in Singapore Dr Natalie Lazaroo

Friday, 23 April
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Passing as White (Collar): Jim Crow’s Typewriter and the Harlem Renaissance Dr Tamlyn Avery

Friday, 7 May
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - HDR Roundtable: Ethical or exploitative? The representation of violence and trauma in literature and screen media  Bonnie Evans, Taryn Bashford, Jasmine Sandes, Meg Vann

Friday, 21 May
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Converging Professions or Practices? Shifting Dynamics in a Digital Communication World Toning Down the Antagonism Between Communication and Journalism Dr Franzisca Weder

Friday, 4 June
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Facilitating co-innovation towards sustainable livestock systems in Timor Leste – pulling out all the (communication) stops A/Prof Elske van de Fliert

Friday, 18 June
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar -  Holograms and (Dis) Embodied Intimacy in an Era of Ubiquitous Computing Dr Samantha Lindop

Friday, 6 August
1-2pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - All Scripts are Adaptations? Michael Eaton MBE

Friday, 27 August
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Chilling Effect: The law, lawyers, journalists, and editorial processes Dr Richard Murray

Friday, 10 September
12-1pm

Online via Zoom

Research Seminar - Mrs America’s Prosthetic Feminist Memory: The ‘Discovery’ of a Cool Feminism for Postfeminist Times Dr Marg Henderson and Dr Anthea Taylor (USyd)

Friday, 24 September
1-2pm

Online via Zoom

In coversation with Laura Elvery A/Prof Stephen Carleton

 

Venue

Room: 
Digital Learning Space (Room 224, Level 2), Joyce Ackroyd Building (#37)